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The ABCs of Tax Form 1095

Customers are required to report their health coverage on their federal income taxes each year. What type of coverage you had last year determines what type of tax form you get. Below is a description of the three tax forms, who sends them, and what customers should do with them.

 

1095-A

If you were enrolled in a qualified health plan through the Exchange, you’ll get a 1095-A Health Insurance Marketplace Statement. Your 1095-A will list all covered individuals and any tax credits you received each month to help pay for your monthly premium. If you were covered by a catastrophic plan, you won’t receive a 1095-A.

How do I get my form? Sign in to your Washington Healthplanfinder account to get your 1095-A from your account’s Message Center.

Use your 1095-A to fill out IRS Form 8962: Premium Tax Credit. You’ll attach Form 8962 to Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040NR, when you file your federal taxes. You can’t file with Form 1040EZ.

 

1095-B

If you were covered by Washington Apple Health, by a private health plan purchased outside of Washington Healthplanfinder, or by your employer (who employs 50 employees or less), you’ll get a 1095-B: Health Coverage. This will list all covered individuals and serve as proof of minimum essential coverage for the year.

Who will mail the form? Washington Health Care Authority, your private health insurance company, or your small business employer.

For Washington Apple Health customers, your 1095-B will be mailed in January to the address listed on your Washington Healthplanfinder account.

What do I do with this form? You’ll check a box on your federal tax return to confirm that you had minimum essential coverage. Check your 1095-B for accuracy and keep it with your other important tax documents. You don’t need your 1095-B to file your taxes. You do not need to return this form to the Washington Health Care Authority.

 

1095-C

Were you covered by the Public Employees Benefits Board (PEBB) or your employer (who employs 50 employees or more)? You’ll get a 1095-C: Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage. Your 1095-C will list all covered individuals and serves as proof of minimum essential coverage for the year. Employers are generally required to distribute form 1095-C by March 31.

What do I do with this form? 

You’ll check a box on your federal tax return to confirm that you had minimum essential coverage. Check your 1095-C for accuracy and keep it with your other important tax documents. You don’t need your 1095-C to file your taxes.

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